Category Archives: Industry Research

EXTRA: 7 Questions: Telecommuting

8-Misconceptions-About-Working-From-Home

Thanks to Daniel Zeevi and DashBurst for this fab graphic.

For this installment of 7 questions, I’m tackling a question that a lot of people seem to have on their minds these days, as costs are rising and quality of life seems to be diminishing. In addition, I know that many of you are young professionals and sometimes juggling home, family and work is a pretty difficult circus act.

Working from home has come under fire a lot in recent years (Marissa Mayer and Yahoo! come to mind), in part because employees are not often held as accountable for their work and productivity. That said, a productive employee is a productive employee, and chances are if they are motivated enough to examine how they can be a better worker, they are motivated enough to make telecommuting work to its greatest advantage.

So without further adieu, the questions:

Read on for the burning questions.

Webinars: April 11-April 25, 2013

webinarsI love a good webinar, and there are a ton of them out there! I’ll be posting a list of them weekly; if you’re interested, follow the link for more information and to register. See my Webinars page for an ongoing listing. (NOTE: Membership may be required to access webinars.)

Click here for this week’s listing.

Magic Monday: Stop Multitasking

“Magic Monday” posts help you start the week off right. Monday is a great day to review and regroup; if you set your mind to it, you can make this your best week yet. Thank gosh it’s Monday!

I am the world’s worst multi-tasker. Some days I can’t even walk the 10 feet from my assistant’s office to the time clock without getting distracted. I am very guilty of trying to do too much, in which case everything I am trying to accomplish suffers. Studies have shown that multitasking isn’t worth it for most people. If you have trouble single-tasking, here’s a short video that may help. The difficult part may be focusing on the video without trying to do something else at the same time!

Have any of you largely eliminated multitasking from your work day? Have you noticed a difference?

The Golden Goulash: April 6, 2013

chfA short collection of the most interesting articles and features that found their way across my desk this week. I’ll be collecting these gems and posting them every Saturday. If you find any articles that rocked your world this week, let me know on my Contact Page and I’ll add them to the next Golden Goulash!

Click Here for This Week’s Helping.

Funny Friday: Nap Time

So what have we learned today, class? That Kylie can be super great at writing blog posts in advance, but is not so good at scheduling them! So today, as you may have noticed, is a twofer: onefer yesterday and onefer today. Thanks for indulging my crazies.

Maybe it just means that I need a nap. Fortunately, I found a great post on Mashable, originally published at The Jane Dough with a fab infographic (from The Daily Infographic; be still my heart) about the benefits—and trivia—of naps and napping. It also makes a case for businesses offering nap rooms to their employees. (Though, until it is condoned, I wouldn’t jump right into the idea.) Enjoy.

Click here for the super-long infographic!

Field Trip: Palace Theater, Manchester, NH

palace with arrow

Photo courtesy LHAT website, with my additions.

Once in a while, I get to crawl out of the depths of my theater and my city and take a trip to see how the other half lives. Recently, on a trip to New Hampshire to visit family, I was treated to a trip to see the opening night of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat at Manchester’s historic Palace Theatre, located at 80 Hanover Street.

This was quite the treat for me. I had been in attendance at the San Diego conference in 2012 where the Palace from the Outstanding Historic Theater award from the League of Historic American Theatres (a great professional organization, by the way); I had been jonesing to see it ever since. Relatedly, being able to watch a show, that I don’t have to do anything for, incognito, so to speak, is always delightful. No (or at least, less) stress, no professional cringing at technical issues, no worries about overly long concession lines, no need to address bathroom backups. None of the myriad “emergencies” that present themselves when dramatic people, and the people who love them, get together for a show.I was in working-vacation heaven.

LHAT_award_STATUE+LR

The lovely LHAT statuette, designed by EverGreene Architectural Arts.

There is a lot to like about the Palace. The Will Call line was fast-moving and efficiently clerked, the lobbies were spacious and allowed for a free flow of traffic. They had a rather nice piece of donor wall-art, created with different-sized plates indicating donor levels. Other sponsors were alternated on the curtain before the show and listed in the program, some with topical and attractive program ads. The brochures and flyers that were available were attractively designed. Once inside the theater, the number of seats and size of the auditorium gave a cozy feel that lends itself well to seeing live theater. Our seats were in the third row, house left, and were well-spaced and comfortable. The complimentary beverage, and pre-orders taken by a friendly server, were a nice touch and made us feel special. They also saved us from standing in line at intermission! Certain tickets carry these perks.

The show was very well done. The performers were enthusiastic, energetic and talented, and the cast was peppered with some great dancers and singers, including a very young break dancer! The band of brothers were very funny and stole the show, and the audience enjoyed it thoroughly.

It was nice, as always, to see such a lovely historic space nestled comfortably into a thriving downtown area, and the Palace was located on a street with lighted trees and storefront shops. I would definitely visit again in the future. Kudos to everyone at the Palace—keep up the good work!

I’d love to hear about your travels to other venues and organizations. Feel free to contact me or share them below!

Live Blog: The Golden Goulash, March 16, 2013

chfA short collection of the most interesting articles and features that found their way across my desk this week. I’ll be collecting these gems and posting them every Saturday. If you find any articles that rocked your world this week, let me know on my Contact Page and I’ll add them to the next Golden Goulash! This week’s edition comes to you from Cinefest in Syracuse, New York.

Click Here for This Week’s Helping.

Webinars: March 14-March 28, 2013

webinarsI love a good webinar, and there are a ton of them out there! For those of you who aren’t familiar with them, they are seminars on a variety of topics, offered over the internet, usually with an expert speaker and a visual presentation. They’re great training for people with limited training budgets who want to know more about a particular development topic; many of them are offered for a nominal fee, and some are even free! I’ll be posting a list of them weekly; if you’re interested, follow the link for more information and to register. See my Webinars page for an ongoing listing. (NOTE: Membership may be required to access webinars.)

Click here for this week’s listing.

Tool Box: The Arts Index

tool boxWhile I would love to tell you that I sprang full-grown from the foam of the artistic sea, I actually earned my degree in geology and English Composition. Part of that research scientist nerdiness is still with me, however, and development research makes me drool a little. Ok, a lot.

So when The Arts Index (a project of Americans for the Arts) came to my attention, I was super stoked. Not only was it a research project, but its data is readily useable by those who need it. (As much as I love research, I admit that getting relevant findings to the public in a useable way is often an issue.)

Read on for more about this tool…

Webinars: March 7-March 28, 2013

webinarsI love a good webinar, and there are a ton of them out there! For those of you who aren’t familiar with them, they are seminars on a variety of topics, offered over the internet, usually with an expert speaker and a visual presentation. They’re great training for people with limited training budgets who want to know more about a particular development topic; many of them are offered for a nominal fee, and some are even free! I’ll be posting a list of them weekly; if you’re interested, follow the link for more information and to register. See my Webinars page for an ongoing listing. (NOTE: Descriptions are excerpted from the host website. Membership may be required to access webinars.)

Click here for this week’s listing.